The Role of Strategy in IT Leadership

Full Transcript

Scott Kinka:

Hi, and welcome to another episode of The Bridge. I’m your host, Scott Kinka and I’m super thrilled to be joined for the second time this year, I think it was maybe nine months ago we were together last, by Chris MacFarland, who’s the chairman and CEO of Masergy, which is part of Comcast business and we’ll talk a little bit more about that on the episode. Welcome back to the podcast, Mr. MacFarland.

Chris MacFarland:

Scott, thanks for having me back. Been looking forward to this discussion for a couple of weeks.

Scott Kinka:

Perfect. Well, we have a lot of ground to cover, and we’re going to get into it. For those who are our regular listeners, we start with a little bit of a career background. How did you get here? We personalize it a little bit. We’re going to skip that portion of the agenda because we got into a lot of that, even some of our shared background in the early days of VoIP. I think we talked about it a little bit last time, Chris. We’re going to link for those of you who are paying attention and maybe didn’t see that episode. We’ll link to the previous episode down in the show notes so you can get a little bit about Chris’s background and go through all of that on our last episode together, Chris, and refreshing you, I guess, as well. We talked a lot about your background as an entrepreneur founding Masergy’s eventual sale to Comcast, and then, in the end, we got into a little bit about what it’s like being sort of a reformed CTO tinkerer and an entrepreneur in a big company, and I’m sure we’ll get back to a little bit of that today. For this one, I just wanted first to start off with an update. I mean, a lot’s gone on inside that you’ve sort of completed, if you will, merging Masergy into the overall Comcast business story. So we’ll just start there. Maybe just give us an update at a corporate level on what’s going on.

Chris MacFarland:

Absolutely. Happy to do so. And again, I think the work that you do here with the podcast is just stellar and great for the broader community. Since we met nine months ago, there’s been a lot of change in a lot of different areas. I think it is mostly for the positive when you think about it. And then inside of Comcast business, last year was kind of a marquee year for us in a couple of respects. One, Comcast’s business hit this kind of accolade, being roughly 10 billion in business inside Comcast. We completed the integration of Masergy. I mean, there’s still some work to be done on the IT systems, but I think we’re super proud of the fact that Comcast business now has more than two and a half million customers that we power, more businesses than anyone else in America, including now AT&T. That was kind of the last hurdle for us to get over. We’re still growing at a very, very healthy rate, and then I think that’s probably most relevant to a lot of this audience. Our indirect channel business finally hit the billion-dollar mark, and it’s still growing as well. And so we’re just super excited about the future, and I thought it was important to share a little bit about some major organizational changes that we have inside CB. So, for those who know CB well, we had a handful of operational divisions inside Comcast’s business last November. We had a change in leadership. Ed Zimmerman is now the president of Comcast business. Bill Emper moved into being chairman emeritus, and as part of that, there was a relook at strategy and where we wanted to head over the next decade, and I think smartly. So we made this decision to collapse, streamline the organization itself, and split the business into two different ways. One is around small business solutions, and the second one is through enterprise solutions. And you’re going to hear this recurring theme from us probably ad nauseum from this point forward, which is all about how do we really, really enhance the cyber posture of any size business and then how do we make them more resilient in a world where we’ve seen the journey to the cloud does the transformation. I know all these monikers that have been around for a while, but it’s just been accelerated, especially when you think about AI and a GI. Then, inside the direct channel itself, we experienced a big leadership change. Craig Nkba chose to retire from the business, although I think we’ll see him again somewhere in the community. At some point in time, Matt Fasnot, who’s no stranger to the channels now the channel chief for Comcast business, and he’s attached at the hip with me or vice versa, thinking through what are the right changes that we need to make and there’s been some changes in strategy. So I talked about the two business segments and where we’re focused on solutions, and I think that’s the thing that I’m most excited about. One, we talked about this a little bit last time, Bill, Ed, Terry, Connell Craig, who’s no longer with us but Matt, all these people are and all the people you don’t know, they’re such high-quality people and I think that’s one of the remarkable things that Brian Roberts and then his father Ralph, who founded Comcast was able to achieve is just being able to put the right people from a leadership standpoint and then the right people on the front lines to be a part of the Comcast family. So, I covered a lot right there, but when I pause with it, I can answer any questions that you have.

 

Thinking Beyond Connectivity: Global Secure Networking

Scott Kinka:

No, I mean, it makes perfect sense. Let me ask sort of a macro level conversation, a macro level question, which is, I think, for tech leaders who are listening to this, CIOs who’ve engaged with Masergy in the past and maybe know some of the legacies, really thought of Masergy sort of as high-end network aggregator slash managed service provider around those services. I may be oversimplifying it, but I think you kind of get where I’m going. How do we think about it? I mean, you’ve finished this. Obviously, think about Comcast differently. I mean, just the wires you have in the ground, the miles of your own connectivity. How do we rationalize those two businesses together? And I guess some of that is in the idea that you’ve got sort of the small business segment and the enterprise segment, but can you just sort of answer that together now? What does that look like to you?

Chris MacFarland:

No, no, I think it’s a great question, and my hope and our collective aspiration is that, over time, all of our channel partners and all of our customers will think about Comcast in a different light. And so when you think about where we’ve been the last 15 years, I’m talking about CB, not Masergy. We have this remarkable infrastructure where we’ve sold a tremendous amount of connectivity, mostly in the form of broadband internet and ethernet services, largely in our Comcast business heavy infrastructure footprints and the market share that we have there and connectivity in small business services is in most markets it’s more than 50% market share. So we’re literally the incumbent on the connectivity side. Now, when you think about enterprise solutions, think broader mid-market to the Fortune 100. We’re kind of single digit from a market share standpoint; now we’re approaching 10%, but just the North American marketplace has 50 billion opportunities. So you can say when you look at the revenue that we’re at versus the white space there, it’s not insignificant. But when we look at what that really means, looking backwards, like the high-end stuff that Macer G did and then the high-end stuff that CB did, which was largely around the retail vertical, we now believe that this is the year that Comcast’s business is an aspiration. We want to be the leader in global secure networking, and we think we have a plan to work against that. It’s about how we serve these different segments in a thoughtful way with more than just connectivity. And so you’ll see these massive investments in us in both. First, we’re going to compete in all markets in North America, not just the Comcast infrastructure markets. So we’re adding tons of salespeople out of the market. We’re investing heavily in Western Europe underneath the Sky brand, which is a part of Comcast. Secondarily, the solutions that we’re bringing to market are probably where you might be headed because there are all of these people who do what I think are great over-the-top solutions. We want to have a right to compete to win that business as well. We’ve got a SAS-based cloud-first product that we’re just now launching that meets that lower mid-market solution set that we really haven’t had in the channel, much less even with our own direct Salesforce. That’s a big gap that we’re solving. We’ve got zero trust-based secure clouding networking product coming out in the fall that we’re super excited about. So now, and then on the very low end, somebody who just has broadband internet ten employee company where we probably already have broadband internet if they’re in a Comcast market, we’ve got a solution called Secure Network Edge that enhances their cyber profile, gives ’em the resiliency of technology like SD-WAN or SASS E and can do it for a single site for just another couple hundred a month greatly a, so there’s this broader theme, Scott, where I feel like we have this responsibility to US companies no matter the size to really, really help them out with their cyber posture and their resiliency. And so this whole secure networking theme is that we’re all in on this, and we feel like there’s no reason for Comcast business not to be the market leader in both small business and enterprise. Granted, it’ll probably take us half a decade to a decade to get there, but that’s okay with it. We’re in it for the long run here.

 

Balancing Offense and Defense in IT Leadership

Scott Kinka:

Got it. So I want to just make sure we don’t skip over two things that were in there, and I think they were super important. One was growing into areas of the country where they’re not Comcast markets per se, where you’re adding salespeople, and you’re moving into them. So, in that world, you would effectively aggregate others’ connectivity so that you can provide a universal network in the same way that the Lex CL that you compete against would have historically done. I just want to make sure that I got that right.

Chris MacFarland:

Hundred percent accurate. Both CB, prior to the Masergy acquisition and enhanced by Masergy, were focused on off-net connectivity, and now we’re going to bring solutions plus off-net connectivity to our arm connectivity. So you should think about Comcast’s business and a true global spirit now.

Scott Kinka:

Got it. Got it.

Chris MacFarland:

We’re focused on just delivering the right outcomes for the right opportunity.

Scott Kinka:

Perfect. The second one, and I’m sure I can tell you guys have been working through this strategy because you were very purposeful about your words. You said global secure networking. You didn’t say connectivity, which is a different thing. I mean, that’s a sub of that, but it really provides networking solutions. So I want to unpack that a little bit, just spend a little bit more time on that because you did mention, and I agree with you, there are a lot of great over-the-top logical next-generation networking and security products and service providers and suppliers out there who you would sit on top of a connectivity option. Obviously, I would venture to guess for many of those suppliers, the actual connectivity that’s servicing their solution in many cases is provided by Comcast, but in the world that you’re sort of angling towards, it’s the global provider of secure networking. You’re asking your customers. I think you said now sort of in the small to midsize market and then maybe later in the year with a zero trust product, a little bit further upmarket to trust you guys, and also for the intelligence portion for want of a better term. And I know it’s wider than that, but I trust you guys for that as well. Speak to your thoughts, Chris, if you will, on the difference between layering and going over the top on somebody else’s network versus getting it all in the box.

Chris MacFarland:

Yeah, it’s a great question. Listen, there are a ton of companies out there that have great service platforms that are right on top of the connectivity that we sell to our customers, and that’s not ever going to change. But we think there are key things that when you combine the connectivity with the managed services around the secure network and domain and cybersecurity domain, cybersecurity and UCAS domains are incredibly more powerful because of some of the differentiation that we can provide to those customers. They still always have the power of choice, but we feel like we’re kind of uniquely positioned to invest not only given the size and scale of the business that we’re at but also, secondarily, why would you not choose to go this? And I can tell you, even in the last year, we just completed the first quarter of 2024; it was by far one of the best sales quarters Comcast businesses have ever seen. The channel had a stellar quarter. We’re winning opportunities that Comcast business three years ago would not have been able to win. So it’s kind of a super exciting time for me. But that being said, there’s this white space specifically in the channel where, and it’s going to take some time, I’d love to think that we could accomplish it in 2024, but I know Matt FAU is deeply focused on that, but we want people to think about Comcast business differently. We just want the right to have the opportunity to compete for the business. I’m hopeful that if we compete, we’ll win more times than not, but people think about us as this broadband company historically and then on the transport side, where we win almost everything that’s in our markets when you think about high-end global opportunities, that was Masergy’s Forte. We won that business, and that’s been accelerating, but it’s that cross-section. And so you think, well, who would we typically compete with and thank companies like AKA and companies that are in that sassy space? Our down market from where Masergy has been historically, Cato, would probably be another good example of that. But again, I’m excited because we’re able to take some of the AIOPs work that we’ve done, and we’re going to push that down, the threat management response things that we do to enhance cyber posture, push that down to a single site so you could be a bakery and we’re going to give you some things that you probably never would’ve had before, and it’ll be in an automated fashion because there’s a difference in scale for these things. But we’ve been incredibly thoughtful about wanting to have the right to compete and, more importantly, the right to win. Lastly, it should be done at a competitive level, both with the technology, the solutions, the managed services, and the customer experience, but at a rate that’s compelling as well.

Scott Kinka:

You mentioned AI, let’s stay there for a minute. I was fortunate enough to have been invited to the innovation center. I guess Comcast has two towers right here in Philly for the innovation summit. I guess it was probably a month or so or so ago, which was spectacular. And, of course, that was across all the businesses, the entertainment business and the parks business. Sky was there, and obviously, Comcast and Comcast business were represented, but it was really the innovation conference. So it was less about, hey, here’s all the goodies that you’re going to get and more about the work that you’re doing. So it was topically focused as opposed to being brand- or business-focused from a Comcast perspective. It’s a big section on AI, and obviously, there are innovations being made all throughout the Comcast NBC universal family around AI. Tell me specifically about the Comcast business where you guys are leaning in.

Chris MacFarland:

Yeah, so I’m glad that you were able to see that when you were at the technology center. There are a lot of different projects in flight inside Comcast under the broader AI umbrella. When we think about Comcast’s business, we see multiple areas of significant opportunity. I know you and I chatted a little bit about this nine months ago, but as we see large language models accelerate machine learning capabilities, our CTO and CIOs have been focused on where the things that we could do to make a difference in either the customer experience or the reliability. On the networking side, we’ve got some AIOPs technology that helps customers have visibility to things that they probably wouldn’t have visibility on their own, and we see that impact them every day. Secondarily, when you look down at small business, we have one of the fastest growing mobile platforms in North America, so mobile’s a big part of our strategy in the small business segment, but we feel like there are some things we can do to greatly enhance the dialogue between us and that small business customer where they can talk to a sales agent slash operations agent that’s able to really help them navigate all the complexity of mobile without having to wait to talk to a live human. We literally think that we can take somewhere between 80 and 90% of that interaction and help them. So it’s fast because we think that, and we know that this AI-assisted world is where we’re in the next couple of years. Then, hopefully, beyond that, probably one of the more exciting things to me is not thinking about just Comcast but our industry and then just the society at large. We probably have the equivalent of 500 million non-paid people coming into the workforce over the next few years, and this will dramatically enhance our productivity across the domain. So again, there are a lot of things that I could go into. Unfortunately, most of it’s still not public.

Scott Kinka:

I get it, totally.

Chris MacFarland:

But Comcast is definitely just like I think every business in America, evaluating, deploying, get projects in flight and then have a longer term roadmap that gets rewritten every 90 days because there’s just so Much happening. Advancement on top innovation. We’re truly in this exponential curve with this technology.

 

Navigating Evolving Roles in the Age of Exponential Innovation

Scott Kinka:

I guess one of the things that was probably obvious, but you didn’t really think about it until it was stated. I think that was shared there was that when you look at the multiple businesses that fall in the family, you get the consumer business and all those areas where you’re, I mean, I’m connecting to this service on a Comcast connection right now from my home. You’ve got the mobile business, you’ve got the small business unit, you’ve got the enterprise focus. Now you have all of the data that you’re collecting on the entertainment side, and you’ve got everything as it relates to the parks. I mean, the cool thing is that for large language models to be effective, they need to be trained, and you guys are in a unique position that there is a 360-degree view of data that is probably very unique to Comcast amongst the kinds of companies like you in the United States. I mean the entertainment that’s being consumed, the consumer who is consuming them, and the business networks that are also connected. If you’ve got access to all of that data to inform your models, which to me just sort of popped off the page as we were thinking about, I don’t recall the numbers, but there were sort of one slide where they were like, if you consider all of these sources of information, we think we can inform our models to be useful to us X times faster than anybody else could because we have the consumer and the entertainment side as well.

Chris MacFarland:

Being an insider, it’s such a different perspective of the world. I get asked, and thankfully, it’s slowed down, but typically, when I meet a peer or colleague an employee, one of the questions I get if they’re brave up is like, why are you still here? And I said, well, fundamentally, there’s a few things. First, there’s a lot of work still to be done on the integration and getting us to the right glide path. Two, it’s high-quality people, every executive, middle manager and frontline employee that I’ve met or just really good people. So, I think the culture was just stellar and was incredibly easy to navigate through the integration. Third, arguably, we’re the largest media telecommunications company in the world, and I don’t think a lot of people see that day-to-day, but we have more internet traffic than anyone, period. So the data that rides over our network, the second to no one, is basically us and then a bunch of other companies. And then there’s Google on the other side from a data center perspective. And then that landscape’s changing because of the velocity of Azure over the last few years. And then when you think about the media component between the studios, NBC, sky and Europe, which is arguably for those of you that are North America folks, kind of the ESPN of Europe, and then we have all these other brands in other countries, and then we have Universal studios. I mean, a lot of people don’t realize it, but Oppenheimer was universal to us. We had two of the most accredited movies in the past year. But then, being able to have insights into what’s next, how are we thinking about this video? Linear cable has been on the decline for quite a few number of years. We’re seeing this change with technologies, and we think we’ve got insights that are second to know in this because it is a broader view, but it’s a really thoughtful view, which is how do we make people’s lives better through media? How do we make their lives better through the communication services? And now, for the stuff that I’m focused on, how do we enhance the cyber posture because cyber’s still at the top of my mind right after reliability? In a world that’s gotten more complex, how do we simplify that? So it’s just an exciting time because you’re right, and I hate to say it, those of us that are much larger in nature have not only the ability to invest for growth, we have the ability to take longer bets around how do we leverage data but still do it in a way that’s thoughtful around privacy because we have all that information, but we are, I should say this, we are so much more caring than the big cloud vendors, vendors in terms of what privacy means and what that means to the individual and to our customers.

Scott Kinka:

And that was a big theme there as well. I want to hit on something, though. You were talking about your career, the things that you’re interested in, and the work that you’re continuing to do, which is around strategy. As I was just prepping this morning for this episode, I read through our previous conversation. We had a little bit of fun, sort of, as I think I called myself a reformed CTO, and you might’ve called yourself something like master tinkerer or something along those lines back in the day. But here we are, both of us are engaged in strategy roles and certainly bigger companies than we found or started, and we met each other way back then in many, I look at it, and I think that in many ways that parallels probably what a lot of our listeners have experienced over recent years where I don’t get my hands dirty nearly as much as I used to, but a lot of IT directors are now CIOs or CTOs and they’re, they went from their constituents being other nerds like them to bring the business people in the business, being the salespeople and the executives and the CEOs. I am curious, just in that journey from entrepreneur building PCs, all the craziness you’ve got where you got started through today, what kind of advice would you have for the director or VP of IT who’s finding themselves a CIO and finding themselves in a different peer group that’s really around business, the business people if you’ll,

Chris MacFarland:

Yeah, and then I think during our lifetime, Scott, we’ve seen those roles go from pure cost centers to then being partially strategic to where now today the CIO or the CATO, depending on who’s leading that is in the boardroom, Right? And so the advice that I can give to anyone that’s worked their way up operationally is that strategy in addition to execution strategy becomes just more and more important, but you have to have faith that the team underneath you can execute, right? Yeah. If you can’t execute, you’re done. I think in a bad culture, you’re probably not able to have durability and meaning over years and decades. Then, you want to work yourself to a point where you have 80% strategy if you want to be a CIO or CTO today, and there’s a lot of change coming at you fast. And so I think the biggest shift that I’ve also seen is inside of Comcast business; we call it the long-range plan. Everybody’s got a different name for a five-year or ten-year strategy is not to get so trenched in on what’s three to five years out and have a sense of that’s pretty fuzzy to get there because things are moving at this exponential rate that we’ve talked about. So I haven’t seen anybody’s long-term plans recently shift. And then I think it’s the other thing, and I don’t think we talked about this last time, but if you’re an IT leader today, you have to think and be thoughtful. How do I deal with exponential growth if that’s what’s occurring in your business, or how do I deal with exponential technology because it’s disrupting so many things that have probably been commonplace or even in their own business? How do I add so much strategic value so that we have durability and don’t get disrupted ourselves? And so I see the best CIOs just leaning really, really on. In fact, we had a conference down at the players and brought in a hundred CIOs and spent a couple of days with ’em. And what I saw in this recurring theme, Scott, was that the leaders that are there today are thinking about all these things at the same time. And I heard the same thing about my team. I’m so grateful that they can take the ball and run with these things, or I’ve got experts over these other areas because the pace, that pace of innovation is just not going to slow down. And arguably, with AI and EGI coming online over the next, I don’t know when, two to three years, maybe five, it’s just going to accelerate, which I think is an awesome time to be in this, but it’s also a bit mind-bending when you really think through what the details of this might look like.

 

Preparing for the Tsunami: The Coming Wave of AI and Lifespan Science

Scott Kinka:

Yeah. I do love what you said about planning. I mean, I find that that’s one of the biggest challenges moving from, just from keeping the, I love what you said about it’s a cost center, it’s a strategic business now it’s a profit center. I think one of the big differentials, and I think one of the biggest challenges that we see with IT leaders, is just moving towards the plan. Being able to put pen to paper is a skill that, in a lot of ways outside of managing a list of tasks, you know what I mean, that you really haven’t had to do. Building that strategic vision, you sitting down with a blank piece of paper is intimidating, right? At the end of the day, I always say to our guys, we just went through a big exercise on our side with all of our technology practice leads where we’re like, you got to plan your business, and we’re going through it. Don’t let your portfolio happen to you, right? Don’t sell the thing that the customer asked for every time we are being asked to place the best place your bets why, but if you do a little bit, I’ll tack a hunk of advice on there. I’ll answer my own question to some extent when you’re looking at that blank page. I’ve always said to our guys who are trying that for the first time, I’m like, if you just start with the facts, the answers make themselves apparent. They build a table of contents around all the things I know and let me get them in one spot. And if you do that, by the time you get to page nine of your reality, you’re like, wow, what’s next should be actually reasonably easy. It’s when you sit down, start with a blank piece of paper, and you go, let me write what’s next that you miss, right? It’s so super interesting. Any comment on that? Anything you want to add? 

Chris MacFarland:

I think you’re a hundred percent spot on one; sometimes it’s hard to get the facts. Especially as there’s just, I wouldn’t call it a complete agenda, but people that are focused on different things, especially leaders. And then I think secondarily, you want people aligned, and it’s the same thing for almost every CIO that has left a company. I’ve had a discussion about why they left. I heard this recurrent theme: I had to play more defence than offence, and playing defence nonstop usually meant they didn’t have the resources to play offence, and so they got into this technical debt area or this area where they were just dealing with the challenge of the week or the day or the crisis of the business that month. There’s always going to be challenges. There’s always going to be an occasional crisis, but if you’re stuck in the state where that’s all you’re doing, then you’re probably going to drown in reality. So always have a healthy balance, and as you move up that chain, you’ve got to play more offence than defence.

Scott Kinka:

A hundred percent. Yeah. I mean, I love that as a thought process. We want to invest in AI, but our budget hasn’t increased, right? So, how do you get to the offence if you’re playing defence all the time? It’s obviously one of the things that we focus on with our customers all the time. How do we optimize the plumbing in your business so you can be creative? I mean, ultimately, at the end of the day. So, I totally get it before we wrap, and I always end with funny questions. We don’t need to reiterate those because you answered them already, but I do want to bring something back from our previous call. I always ask about what you are reading, and at the time, you mention some stuff. I think you were into the lifespan. This whole thing was around lifespan last time. Do you remember that? Yes, I did. Still digging in on that, and have you learned anything new as you, you’re sort of going through that process?

Chris MacFarland:

I mean, listen, the life sciences, longevity, lifespan, healthspan world, I think, is going to be a huge shock to people about three years from around today. When I say huge shock, I think of things we talked about before personalized medicine, the shift from Western medicine, which largely treats the symptoms, not the cause of the disease. I think we’re going to pivot, and I think it’s awesome because just in North America, we’ve got a huge obesity problem. I struggle with it myself, but knowing how to personalize it and then, more importantly, how to just be healthier and now live in mental and physical health, I think, is awesome. And then, on the book side, I’m reading a book called The Come Wave, which was written by Mustafa Suliman, one of the founders of DeepMind. It was at Google, and he’s been around in the domain before. Most of us are calling it machine learning, much less a large language model, and the pre of it’s just really thinking through how there is a tsunami coming. We don’t know whether, and this is the tsunami of a GI, we don’t know if this is coming in two to three years or if it’s coming right at the end of the decade, but we do know it’s coming. And this world of abundance, which people like Guru have been preaching about for almost a decade, you can just see it, but it’s going to be disruptive. It’s going to place a lot of people’s jobs. It’s going to help a lot of people’s jobs. Yeah, I mean, there’s so many things that are exciting. There’s so many things that are

Scott Kinka:

Equally terrifying.

Chris MacFarland:

Equally terrifying, right? It’s funny because it was like four years ago or three or four years, I was talking about this on another panel, we were talking about it, but now that we’re on the precipice, you can almost see over the edge of this cliff, and I think in a decade it’ll be a totally new world. I think our children will look back and think about how archaic we were.

Scott Kinka:

Well, I love that. And I think maybe we can look back and say, this was the little part we played and all of that. Maybe if we’re fortunate enough,

Chris MacFarland:

The Prego guys, right? So I mean, How more exciting could it be? We got to live through these two massive transitions.

Scott Kinka:

A hundred percent. A hundred percent. Chris, feel I could talk to you forever. I mean, we could do it on camera. So I’m looking forward to getting on with you again. We said we were going to make this shorter because we didn’t have to do all the intros, and here we are, 35 minutes into it. So I’m going to, in the interest of our listeners hanging with us, close it out at this point. Thank you for your time. As always, it was so great having you on The Bridge.

Chris MacFarland:

Of course. Thanks so much.

Scott Kinka:

For any more information you’d like to find out, you can check out Chris on LinkedIn. He’s there. Obviously, Comcast is a very big partner at Bridgepointe. We worked together for quite some time, and we’re having a lot of success together. So certainly reach out to your friendly neighbourhood Bridgepointe strategist if you’re in a position and want to learn a little bit more. And we’ll be looking forward to hearing from you soon or seeing you soon on another episode of The Bridge. Thanks, Chris.

 

 

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